Holy apertures, Batman!

Although personally suffering from what appears to be multiple fall viruses, the work at Le Coudeau continues.

We’re forging ahead with our final projects for the property—the outbuildings. We’ve repaired and replaced much of the roofing on the outbuildings. Since deciding to create a winter garden/potting shed in the little lean-to behind my studio, our contractor arrived with a reclaimed double-paned French door (can you say FREE???)  and so the process of busting through the 50 cm stone walls began. A fascinating process.

Creating the aperture for the French doors into my garden room, one stone at a time.

Creating the opening for the French doors into my garden room, one stone at a time.

Left over window getting utilized into my studio. The more light the better!

Here the doors are installed and the guys are creating hole #2 to utilize a left over window in my studio. The more light the better!

Here's what that facade looks like now. With the huge cracks reinforced and new enduit. We miss the beautiful fall ivy that was on this wall, but it had to be done.

Here’s what that facade looks like now—with the huge wall cracks reinforced and new enduit. We miss the beautiful fall ivy that was on this wall, but it had to be done.

Here's my new window in the studio. The menuisier had made this large window for the kitchen, but I had ordered a double-hung style for there, so the gorgeous oak window was dying to find a home.

Here’s my new studio window from the inside. The menuisier had made this large window for the kitchen, but I had ordered a double-hung style for there, so the gorgeous oak window was dying to find a home. (Check out that ancient fireplace!)

One of my piles of beautiful stones from the demo. Gonna use them through the garden to line walkways.

One of my piles of beautiful stone from the demo.                                                                                      Gonna use them throughout the garden to line new walkways.

"My" side of the garage-BEFORE.

“My” side of the garage-BEFORE.

Hole #3: New garage door opening for my Citroen.

Orifice #3: New garage door opening for my Citroen. Started with the reinforced arch so the wall didn’t collapse. We removed the ‘second floor’ beams on my side to open up the space (planning to use the gorgeous old beams to created raised garden beds.)

Here's the second garage opening to create a 2 (or more) car garage [can you guess that Theo's looking???]

Here’s the second garage opening from outside to create a 2 (or more) car garage [can you guess that Theo’s looking to amass a collection???] The door surround will be styled the same, as well as a new door made to match.

And that’s our goings-on for the last few weeks. Fall is in full force, and I feel terrible that a lot has passed me by while I’ve been trying to sleep off this illness! But art is starting to be hung, a few pieces of furniture are on order, and a final view of the inside of the house is not far off. Hoping to be able to throw a little holiday soirée soon. Thanks for following along!

 

Posted in American Expats in France, Buying a House in France, Expat Blog, Renovating a Home in France, Southwest France American Expat Blog | 3 Comments

Going Through the Roof

With all the chaos still going on around here, I was so delighted to find this little colony of Sternbergia lutea that popped up this month. Now if I can just keep the guys from stomping through them! Will need to add them on my landscape site map so I don’t forget they’re there. What an awesome sunny little surprise to get every year as all the cranes are flying south.

Autumn crocus.

a.k.a., autumn crocus or winter daffodils

And so with the days getting shorter and the winter rains not far off, we are tackling our leaky roofs. Well, we started with the idea of just fixing the joint where they were leaking, but the supporting wood on my studio building was sagging badly. This is most likely one of the earliest buildings on the property, perhaps from the early 1700’s. And so, in true Loevenich form, why just fix what’s wrong and spend a little when you can redo the whole dadburned thing and spend a lot??? And so it goes…

The roof of my studio before. Pretty darn charming, but disintegrating!

The roof of my studio before. Pretty darn charming, but disintegrating!

And once the demo began, many of the delicate ancient tiles disintegrated in the guys’ hands. And a few of the joists were simply tree trunks!

Reinforcing the hand-hewn beams with straight boards.

Reinforcing the hand-hewn beams with straight boards.

Saving the good tiles for repair work on the pigeonnier.

Saving the good tiles for repair work on the pigeonnier.

The finished roof with a special little diamond surprise for Cindy!

The finished roof with a special little diamond surprise for Cindy!

And, in between craziness, we enjoyed a short visit from our friends from Santa Clara, California. 

And, in between craziness, we enjoyed a short visit from our friends from Santa Clara, California.

And I found these AWESOME, hardly-even-been-used, copper pot set for €60!!!!

And I found this AWESOME, hardly-even-been-used, copper pot set for €60!!!!

And one more roof comes off—actually this is the back side of the photo above. The building has this little lean-to part that was added and was rotting badly. You could watch the mold grow in there and you could smell it a kilometer away! JK, but it was really bad. We thought of just tearing the whole thing off, but when the roof work began, we decided to put a tap in and make it my little greenhouse and winter garden. We’ll have two huge skylights made for the roof. I already love the feel of it with all the light.

[A little chuckle associated with this one. Our contractor was telling us he was going to put Pepsi Glass for the windows. Hmm, Pepsi Glass…like glass bottle bottoms? No. Pepsi Glass. As in speaking Portuguese or speaking French? Hmmm. Finally, he said, like plastic, but not plastic. And I said, “Ohhhh, plexiglass?” And he responded, “Oiu, Pepsiglass!!!” Hilarious. It will now be forever known as Pepsiglass in our world!!!]

My future winter garden, sans roof.

My future winter garden, sans roof.

 

And one final major project getting off the ground…the pathway to the front door. Our granite pavè from Portugal was half the price (even with transport) of what we could source it for here in France. (Business idea anyone???) Thought for a while we would need to settle for another type of paver or stones or tile, but the guys came through with the real deal. And we are thrilled to have skilled laborers from Portugal to do their back breaking art. Absolutely fascinating to watch these artisans at work. Just beautiful!

Our granite pavè from Portugal was half the price (even with transport) than we could source it here in France. (Business idea anyone???)

A chunk of the gorgeous granite for the front walkway.

This is two long days of work for two guys carefully laying in one stone at a time. Masters!

This is two long days of work for two guys carefully laying in one stone at a time. Masters!

We are happy that the radiators are in, because fall has definitely arrived. But we still enjoy afternoon hikes with the dogs enjoying the sights, smells, and vibe that only autumn brings.

 

Posted in American Expats in France, Buying a House in France, Expat Blog, Renovating a Home in France, Southwest France American Expat Blog | 1 Comment

The Eagle Has Landed

We’ve been in the main house now for a little over two weeks. And it feels great — like home.

The details of finishing the interior have kept me buried and exhausted. I think of blogging often, but then fall into a coma from the day’s challenges. Sorry to keep you in the dark, but as things start to slow down, I’ll get caught up. Promise!

Here’s another little tour of what we’ve been up to.

In anticipation of finally being able to start hanging light fixtures, I started cleaning the chandeliers…

(Step 5) Try to remember how all the parts go back together again! I don’t recommend mixing wine and crystals…

And speaking of light fixtures, here’s a funny story of my greatest bargain so far! Theo requested a ‘Ralph Lauren’-inspired man cave, so I found a great light fixture that looks like it’s made from wine cask ribs. So in my never-ending search for a good deal, I found one on the ever-questionable AliExpress.com (every single thing from China, every single day). Did some research on the company and they looked okay, then got a coupon for their first anniversary with everything half off. So I waited until the window for the deal and pushed the order button. It arrived in a small flat box. Uh-oh. Obviously needed some assembly. With no help (or encouragement) from the men on site (only disparaging rolling of the eyes), I set out to redeem myself.

I'm gonna do this, dammit!

I’m gonna do this, dammit!

 

And so, here is a peek at the chandelier in place (thank you very much). And here, too, are the guys assembling the bookshelf/tv wall unit I had made in Portugal.

The man cave coming together.

The man cave coming together.

 

The kitchen is together and functional at last. Just need to finish the backsplash, install the radiator, and seal the floors. This first photo is before appliances, countertops and light fixtures, but the last and final window (a behemoth of a single-hung solid oak beauty) is awaiting installation over the sink.

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Then I had the wrenching decision for a countertop. The choices of stone are surprisingly slim here in France. We worked with a wonderful young man who tried to source some wild ideas for me, but in the end, I decided to just use what he had in stock—a honed black granite. And since there is so much visually going on in the kitchen, I’m positive it was the right decision. And I do love it. Interesting, though, that they don’t routinely bullnose granite here, they simply use really thick pieces and polish the edges. Here are the guys installing the countertop.

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And here’s my baby being installed. It took nearly a whole day to figure out how to get her inside, install her, and tweak and test her. And I love her. I’m convinced she is inspiring me to be a better cook!

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We’ve enjoyed visitors from Germany, with Sybille leaving after just a few days for a trek on the Camino de Santiago. The boys dropped her off in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port for her journey and she plans to go the entire way to Santiago de Compostela. Go Sybille!!!

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In the meantime, we’ve finished the oak flooring. Decided on an oil and wax stain that should wear well with the dogs and be easy to ‘spot treat.’ I am impressed with the soft glow of this finish and am surprised it’s not more commonly used in the US. This is the dressing room with the cabinets all painted. My laundry machines will go on the right underneath the window.

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From time to time, we get some rain. And this is what the patio looks like. Chunks of old moss from the roof (still need to power wash and treat the roof tiles) and muddy footprints galore. But we’re always glad for the green it creates.

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And here’s our best worker-bee, Claudio, getting a big hug from boss Ribeiro, while installing the stone baseboards. The cabinet on the right is an ancient cabinet purchased by Theo’s mom, that we simply HAD to bring with us.

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And so the decorating begins. Had the guys cut this out for me to make an upholstered headboard for the maison d’amis. In my spare time. Ha!

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Slipping in a little fun with dinner on Wolfgang’s birthday. ‘Thet’ and ‘August’ celebrating their 50+ year friendship!

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And, lastly, our boxes await. We have everything from America in the pigeonniere, and I am literally ITCHING to get in there and unpack. But I must wait until the floors are sealed and the furniture is in place before weighting it down with all our crap.

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There’s More to a Pool Than Water

Picked up our newest toy today—our pool robot that Theo quickly named “Nessy.”

We’re enjoying a wonderful late summer here in the Dordogne and we’re swimming every day. Our habit right now is to wait until the guys leave and plunge in shortly after 5. No midday heat, but that late searing sun that feels so good. The salt water is fantastic to swim in, and even easier for us to manage as pool neophytes.

Theo's new girlfriend, Nessy.

Theo’s new girlfriend, Nessy.

But we were accumulating some gunk on the bottom, so we called our wonderful ‘pool people’ and they ordered us a hi-tech robot in quick order. Picked it up today, assembled the cart, threw her in, and were just mesmerized by her skills. Crisis-crossing the pool, climbing the sides, eating up everything in her path. Then we swam around her cord, almost like she was our newest friend. Of course the dogs didn’t like it when she poked her head out to clean the waterline of the pool, but they quickly adjusted and figured it wasn’t going to get them.

And so, tomorrow after work, we’ve invited the guys to stay and enjoy an evening swim and some snacks. We told them we were cleaning it JUST for them! It will be nice to share the wonderful pool with such deserving chaps.

Posted in American Expats in France, Expat Blog, Southwest France American Expat Blog | 7 Comments

Long time, no post. NOW we’re in business!

Oh dear, where do I begin?

No internet. We’ve been without an internet connection for nearly 9 weeks. The ugly Americans from Silicon Valley. WITHOUT INTERNET! After anxiously awaiting our long-anticipated Orange appointment on August 17, we had two really creepy guys show up to dig up the street and get our line connected. Then it still didn’t work. So we called to file a report and they promised a “latest possible intervention date” of Saturday. We waited. Nobody showed. We called on Monday morning. They said someone would be here. We waited. Nobody showed. I called my girlfriend who speaks French on Tuesday morning and pleaded my case. She called and ripped somebody a new one. A really nice, competent guy showed up later that day. We had a faulty box. Wouldn’t you know? That sweetheart left us a loaner and a secret code to be able to replace our bad box at the local boutique. Ahhh. Now we’re golden. Well, except for the sloppy wire draped over the front rock wall into our garden by the creepy dudes. Sloppy, lazy work. Period. But we’re happy, happy, happy to have fast internet once again.

To catch up, we’re still living in the guest house, but have enjoyed a few quiet weeks without worker-bees around. The pool is finished, it’s been hot, and we’ve been in it at least once a day. Neither Theo nor I have ever had a personal pool before. Perhaps it’s the novelty of it all, but we are really delighted.

As many people have summer homes here, we have thrilled in meeting more and more friends this summer. Seems that every few days, there is some sort of gathering, or party, or town event. It’s exponential—great friends have great friends. So much fun! We’ve also enjoyed having visits from old friends and are looking forward to hosting several more guests in September.

As far as the house goes, we just have a few more details to finish—baseboards to install, a couple more hardwood floors to stain, sealing of the tiles, still waiting on one last window, and kitchen granite counters and appliances. So close, but we’ll be so happy to have the team back on site next week to bang this out so we can move in!

Here’s a little photo show of the progress in the last two months:

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Going techno-crazy!

Thanks to all of you who have missed my posts. We’re fine and making glorious progress, but are technologically challenged at the moment. Here’s a little update (sans photos).

As scheduled, we moved into our guest house a few days before our deadline of July 1. The guys were able to get all the rooms painted, floors down where needed and the kitchen and bath installed. So we were up and running with more than a roof over our heads (if you know Theo, he doesn’t buy into my joking about us ‘glamping’ here (glamorous camping)…as his idea of camping is a Hilton!)

Anyway, we’re here without an internet connection, waiting on the French system to pull their heads out of you-know-where. We’ve been working on getting the internet installed for months now and have a final ultimatum that they’re actually going to have the paperwork done and show up to connect the line on August 17. It’s a date. On my calendar. I’m counting down…

In the meantime, we have a hotspot that works s-l-o-w-l-y for minimal contact with the world, but isn’t strong enough to upload photos. There’s really no good excuse why I haven’t lugged my laptop to a neighbor or a cafe with internet to post some blogs, but all I can say is, “I’ve been up to my eyeballs in alligators!” Life in the past month has been like building a house in fast forward. I can hardly step away without a question here, or a decision to be made there, not to mention keeping an eye on all that’s going on and making sure it’s right.

We’ve made super duper progress, but are a few weeks behind schedule. In France, August is the month for vacation. Our contractor and all the guys will take a couple of weeks off, our plumber is off, the pool guy is gone, the electrician is outta here, so we’re just planning to stay put in the guest house until every last thing is done. We’re so close right now, it’s tempting to start moving in, but I really want to be able to move in just once.

After next week, we’re looking forward to a couple weeks of peace and quiet and serenity. My new hammock is installed between two trees and I have some fiction to finish…

Posted in American Expats in France, Expat Blog, Renovating a Home in France, Southwest France American Expat Blog | 4 Comments

It’s Hammer Time!

The end of our rental period is quickly staring us in the face and we need to get out of here. Seasonal rentals begin July 1. We are still waiting for the windows and the stone for the floors in the main house, and don’t have the bathrooms finished and no kitchen yet, so we’ve put the Portuguese on fast-forward to get the Maison d’Amis livable so we can move in there first.

Things are going well despite the deluge of rain we’ve had. We’re hearing that Spring is only like this about once every 100 years or so. Lucky us. Theo’s ready to hightail it outta here!

With progress happening so fast at this point, every hour of every day brings new progress. Good surprises mostly. 😝

And the electrical is almost done. Here's the little utility room awaiting final heater and water softener.

The electrical is almost done. Here’s the little utility room awaiting final electrical, heater and water softener.

Bye-bye patio.

Bye-bye patio.

 

Got a little roof on the pool equipment house. Pretty cute, huh?

Got a little roof on the pool equipment house. Pretty cute, huh?

The kitchen floor is down...

The kitchen floor is down…

...and the drywall is going up.

…and the drywall is going up.

 

Wallpaper has been removed from bedroom, ready for primer. New pine floors are under plastic.

Wallpaper has been removed from bedroom, ready for primer. New pine floors are under plastic.

We're trying to salvage the ancient stairs, although the ones to the second floor are pretty bad.

We’re trying to salvage the ancient stairs, although the ones to the second floor are pretty bad.

And the attic insulation is delivered and ready to be blown in once the electrician gives it a thumbs-up.

And the attic insulation is delivered and ready to be blown in once the electrician gives it a thumbs-up.

Posted in American Expats in France, Expat Blog, Moving to Europe, Renovating a Home in France, Southwest France American Expat Blog | 5 Comments

Le Coudeau Update

And you thought just because you weren’t seeing progress shots, there wasn’t anything going on at Le Coudeau! Au contraire!!! I’ve been up to my ass in alligators rushing around solving problems, making decisions, and oh-yeah-did-I-mention that Theo went to the US for nearly 2-1/2 weeks?

This post is mostly for our documentation and for you nosey ones out there. 😉 Here’s an overview of what’s been going on the last three weeks:

The foss septic is nearly finished. The yard now looks like tanks of WWIII just moved through in the rain. Oh well, things grow like crazy here, so we will blink our eyes and the grass will be back I’m sure.

Have to keep detailed photos of the septic installation for the city.

Have to keep detailed photos of the septic installation for the city.

 

The second bathroom in the house is tiled. I’m thrilled with the encaustic floor tiles. Wanted to add some historical element to the house, even though the design is fresher than those used 100 years ago. We had to go a bit higher with the tile on the walls than I wanted, so we ran short and are patiently awaiting the arrival of the reorder.

Guest bathroom.

Guest bathroom.

The Lalinde City Pond swans’ eggs hatched and we now have six new cygnets that everyone is swooning over. We all watched as they built their magnificent nest in the reeds beside the lake and took turns brooding. The sweet babies hatched and mom and dad had them in the water the first day.

The cob (dad) keeping a watchful eye while the pen (mom) takes the babies for a little swim practice.

The proud cob (dad) keeping a watchful eye, while the pen (mom) takes the babies for a little swim.

Oops, back to Le Coudeau. We rebuilt the stairs from the patio down to the pool on one side of our gargantuan patio in the back and built a ramp for pool access on the opposite side.

Newly rebuilt stairs. Not the character of the original ones, but much safer!

Newly rebuilt stairs. Not the character of the original ones, but much safer!

The plaster maestro finishing the side of our new ramp down to the pool.

The plaster maestro finishing the side of our new ramp down to the pool.

Here’s what Theo gets for leaving the continent with yours truly in charge. I’ve been on the fence about lightening up the ceiling in the living room. The wood is in amazing condition for its age and I kind of hated to cover it up. On the other hand, this room is pulling me in a bit of a contemporary direction and I wanted to lighten it up and “tame” the woodiness a bit, so made the executive decision to have the guys add drywall between the beams. I like it and am glad I went ahead and did it. You know how it is once you move into a home, you rarely go back and do big messy projects like this.

Our favorite Romanian placo boss. They got this up in a day!

Our favorite Romanian placo boss. They got this up in a day!

Even though it was raining cats and dogs last week, the guys hung tents off the roof outside the house so that they could re-stucco the outside. Our Portuguese crew are true artisans. They kept the finish slightly mottled so it wouldn’t look too new. The color is integral and it looks absolutely fantastic (and we had some ugly gouges and cracks to fix).

Wow, tarps and scoffolds and stucco and rain!

Wow, tarps and scoffolds and stucco and rain! Don’t worry, Stewart, it’s not finished in this photo…

 

 

 

While all this is happening, it is spring and the peonies are breathtaking.

While all this is happening, it is spring and the peonies are breathtaking.

While we wait for materials on the main house, we have attacked the guest house. We decided to convert the attic to a second bedroom. The guys installed two skylights, and it is now electrified, drywalled, and primed, with new pine floors.

New second bedroom in the guest house attic.

New second bedroom in the guest house attic.

Ripped out bathroom awaiting her makeover!

The ripped out bathroom awaiting her makeover!

 

 

 

 

And as if all of this isn’t enough, I was informed to poop out a landscape plan for the front. Since we have the excavator on the premises, the old flagstones are coming out and I need to order whatever I need. Yikes! Stayed up almost all night on Friday and finally came up with a plan that I think will work.

Theo's such a good sport! Here he is posing as a 2-meter tall fountain.

Theo’s such a good sport! Here he is posing as a 2-meter tall fountain, so I can sketch it in.

We need to get out of our rental house and starting living at Le Coudeau in two weeks. Needless to say, we will be in the guest house for a few weeks, but if we can have a bathroom and some sort of kitchen setup, we will be happy to be ‘glamping’ in our new digs. The tiles for the guest house kitchen and bath should arrive tomorrow. The oak flooring for the main house is set for delivery tomorrow. The replacement tiles for the second bathroom should be here early next week. The paint, the custom vanities for the bathrooms, and the tv/bookcase unit for the family room will arrive from Portugal early next week. The stone for the house floors and master bathroom are in production and should arrive in the next two weeks. Whew. And lastly, the kitchen is in production as well and should arrive in less than a month. The retailer has all our appliances and is chomping at the bit to get them out of their back room!

Just had to sneak in one more shot of these guys.

Just had to sneak in one more shot of these guys.

Posted in American Expats in France, Drainage and Foss Septic in Dordogne, Expat Blog, Renovating a Home in France, Southwest France American Expat Blog | Leave a comment

Design 101

I promised to bring you along on my Magical Mystery Design Tour and offer a glance inside my process. Now, after looking at thousands, probably more like tens of thousands, well maybe a million different items online (in French), I’ve pulled together my room boards. Of course, rooms will contain smaller items we brought from America and a few pieces that we brought from Theo’s parents house in Germany. Some new items are already purchased. Others are probably just a pipe dream. Each room board is still missing elements, but this gives an initial idea of my design direction for the house. It will be interesting to compare these with the ‘final’ product…

I’ve spoken with a few of you about how this house has baffled me, design-wise. Usually I walk into a house, it speaks to me, and I instantly know what I want to do with it. This one was an enigma for some time. I am grateful that the sales process here took so blasted long—it gave me time to process, to hang out in the house, to collect ideas and sources, and try to grasp it’s mojo. And one day it came to me—I was so relieved. I think I was fighting myself to make it a fairly “French” house. I certainly didn’t want a home that looked like it fell out of “Vintage French Design” magazine, but wasn’t prepared to try and marry modern with the architecture either. We’re eclectic folks who certainly enjoy a few good antiques, a little bit of contemporary, some oddball things, lots of color, great dimmable lighting, and most of all, comfort. (I was going to do an entire post on my lighting choices because that’s such a huge part of any design, but I’ll spare you the agony!) I love the use of classic shapes with modern materials. The unexpected. We’ll just have to wait and see.

It’s been an interesting process so far. Sometimes I feel like I’m riding one of those mechanical bulls: In control to begin with, then suddenly completely out of control, bumping around in every direction, to getting into the rhythm and taming the beast a bit, just to be jerked around again, all the while knowing that it will be a lasting memory, but at the same time realizing the experience will soon be over.

And so, on with the ‘shoew.’

Le-Coudeau-Design-Boards
Posted in American Expats in France, Buying a House in France, Expat Blog, Interior Design Concept Boards, Renovating a Home in France, Southwest France American Expat Blog | 2 Comments

The Tale of Cindy’s Kitchen, Part 2. Finally.

FINALLY got my FINAL kitchen plan out the door and on its way to the menuisier (the carpenter) in Portugal for construction. FINALLY!!

Was waiting for the drywall to all be finished for absolute last measurements and also to FINALLY make up my mind on a few questionables. This process was very stressful, as I don’t speak any language that anyone involved understands, and have to rely solely on my graphic skills to communicate what I want. Ugh. It’s a first for me and has been a good learning experience—just hope I get what I intended to order!!!

Wanted to share my little design journey about the refrigerator unit:

Whether we went with totally custom units or not, I wanted the refrigerator surround to be a showpiece. Since the kitchen is so long and narrow, I wanted to break up the long run of cabinets. And previously, when I planned to make the archway between the kitchen and living rooms, the fridge would have been visible front-and-center from the living area, so wanted it to be spectacular. Even though that plan didn’t culminate, I liked the placement of the fridge.

Don’t know if I’ve mentioned how frustrating shopping for appliances in a foreign country has been. We are simply so spoiled in America with our vast choices and low prices. I wanted an “American Fridge,” as they’re called here—mostly meaning large capacity with built-in freezer and automatic ice maker, instead of the much more common built-ins or small units. And I would have loved a panel-ready unit, as I wanted to end up with something like these:

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But after finding just a couple of large panel-ready ones to the tune of over €12,000, definitely decided I could ‘live’ with stainless steel! So my next thought was, “Wow, if I can’t have panel-ready, maybe I can bring some ‘patina’ into the kitchen by taking an old massive armoire and chopping it up to become something of beauty.” And so the search began.

Then the issue of actually BUYING the right furniture piece and chopping it up so it would look okay began to worry me, so I switched gears again and decided maybe it was easiest to just add an antique ‘fronton’ to the top of a custom wood unit. As my base cabinets are black and the uppers will be cream, I wanted a wood piece to break up the black-and-whiteness of it all.

Found this one for only €30, but the blasted people would not respond to their ad!

Found this one for only €30, but the blasted people would not respond to their ad!

Unable to actually PURCHASE a fronton, the deadline was looming to get the final measurements to the carpenter. Without THE piece and THE exact width, it was impossible to complete the kitchen design.

And so I folded. I sketched for a day under pressure and came up with the following design, which I think is going to be absolutely fine.

Refrigerator CabinetThe fridge will slide right in, the surround will be chunky enough to balance out the size of the unit, I’ll have room for cookbooks on the lower opening and still have a beautiful lighted niche for something really fantastic above. It will give me the height and interest I’m looking for. Whew. And off went my plans to Portugal! Stay tuned.

Not sure when to expect the kitchen to be completed, but I’m sure we won’t have it by our move-in date of June 15. But in the meantime, we can barbecue and use the guest house kitchen—gonna be ‘glamping’ for a while.

 

 

Posted in American Expats in France | 5 Comments